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The 6 Things Every Stakeholder Wants

Emad Aziz 6 Things Stakeholders Want from Project ManagersYou think you know what your stakeholders want. Emad Aziz has a model that will make sure you do. He shared it with delegates at the PMI Global Congress EMEA earlier this month and it will give you a huge degree of clarity when starting to work with a new group of project stakeholders or a new sponsor.

And it’s easy.

Emad said in his presentation that there are 6 things that every stakeholder wants. Let’s take a look at the list.

1. To know what’s in it for them

Many, many people are motivated by knowing what the benefit is for them. Depending on your project this could be one (or more) of several reasons including:

  • An easier life through a better process
  • Faster turnaround times for key activities
  • The opportunity for a bonus or to make more money
  • Recognition
  • A boost to their career.

If you can point out what personal benefit they will be receiving then you’re more likely to get them to engage with the project.

2. To know what’s in it for the organisation

People also like to understand the big picture. Project sponsors should get this already but stakeholders from other areas of the organisation may need you to explain it.

This is the five-minute version of the business case: a quick rundown on why you are doing this project and what business problems it will solve.

3. To trust you

Stakeholders need to be assured that they can trust you. They want to feel comfortable that you won’t repeat confidential information or gossip about them behind their backs. They need to feel that you have personal and professional integrity and that you’ll be acting in an ethical way.

There are some practical ways to show that you are trustworthy in this article about working in a transparent way.

What project stakeholders want

4. To see your capability

Whether you are aware of it or not, stakeholders are judging you on how capable they perceive you to be. They want assurances that you are a capable project manager: a safe pair of hands. They need to feel that you have the relevant skills required to get this project done and if you don’t have the skills yourself, that you know where to source them.

“Relevant skills” means different things for each project but as a minimum you’ll be wanting to demonstrate that you can:

  • Plan
  • Schedule
  • Report on status
  • Handle the budget
  • Manage risk
  • Deal with issues
  • Communicate
  • Lead the team.

The easiest way to find out if your sponsor has any worries in this area is to ask them.

5. To know you are committed

Project sponsors want a project manager who is committed to the project. They don’t want to be briefing new project managers every few months. They want assurances that you are in it until the end.

Stakeholders also want to know that you are committed to the ideals of the project; the vision. You need to understand it, articulate it to others and show that you are doing that. Stakeholders want to work with a project manager who will not undermine the goals and objectives by being off-hand or indifferent to their mission.

6. To be indemnified

Finally, stakeholders want to work with project managers who won’t screw it up. They want you to act to do no harm. Everyone knows that mistakes happen and sometimes you can’t foresee every issue. But in general, stakeholders want assurances that you have their backs and that you aren’t going to make their situation worse.

I think that’s a really clear and easy guide to looking at your project from a stakeholder’s perspective. When you boil down what your sponsor expects from you, this is it.

Find out what else sponsors want in this article about how to get the best from your sponsor.

 

About Elizabeth Harrin

Elizabeth HarrinElizabeth Harrin FAPM is a professional project manager and award-winning blogger behind A Girl's Guide To Project Management. She's passionate about demystifying project management and making tools and techniques work in the real world. She's also the author of several books including the PMI bestseller, Collaboration Tools for Project Managers.
Elizabeth lives in the UK with her family. She uses her organisation and project management skills at home, and also to help other bloggers at Totally Organised Blogging.

Comments

  1. Chris Enwudor says

    25 February, 2016 at 7:54 pm

    I have enjoyed your articles on stakeholder management/ engagement generally.ln the public sector in Nigeria this procedure is hardly followed. Government just provide the infrastructure they consider necessary for the people without engaging the stakeholders to know what they really want..How do we improve success rate in public projects in such a setting?

    • Elizabeth Harrin says

      26 February, 2016 at 1:39 pm

      I’m afraid there are no quick answers, Chris. It’s awareness and learning from failures that will make the difference. The ongoing maturing of project management in your part of the world will help too, but that all takes time.

  2. Andrew Hinton says

    26 May, 2015 at 5:46 pm

    Really liked this article, so true the advice to clearly articulate what is in it for the stakeholder as the first priority above all the others.

    • Elizabeth Harrin says

      7 June, 2015 at 8:25 pm

      Agreed. If you can hit the ‘what’s in it for me’ then you really make everything else much easier. Once that’s cracked, your stakeholders can more easily make the connection between the project and something they want, so the rest of the relationship flows from there.

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