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Happy Anniversary Women in PM SIG! An interview with Teri Okoro

Teri Okoro

Teri Okoro

Next month sees the APM’s Women in Project Management group holding the 2014 National Conference & 21st Anniversary of Women in Project Management in London. I spoke to Teri Okoro, Chair of the special interest group and part of the team behind the anniversary preparations.

Teri, what’s on the agenda for the WiPM SIG now you’ve hit 21 years? And what celebrations are planned to celebrate 21 years?

WiPM have taken time to reflect on past achievement as well as plan for the future. We’ve redefined our mission with four key elements:

  • developing a powerful profile
  • promoting a barrier free culture
  • engaging with and responding to project professionals
  • building a collaborative community.

We are just concluding our second survey which has highlighted key issues and concern for our project managers today which they want the WiPM to address. We will start to profile female project managers on our web pages shortly. A support group for those applying to step up to RPP and FAPM is planned.

WiPM have branded 21st anniversary events around the country. We are very excited about the 2014 National Conference & 21st Anniversaryscheduled on 25th September 2014 in London with Baroness Susan Greenfield and Dame Stephanie Shirley as keynote speakers in the afternoon and a separate evening event with Vanessa Vallely and the Funny Women. Further information can be found, and bookings can be made, online here: 2014 National Conference & 21st Anniversary of Women in Project Management.

21 years is a long time! What’s the biggest change you’ve seen in the project management arena since you started managing projects?

Technology is one key area of change in both our role as project and programme managers and in the way we communicate and operate as a SIG. Teams are able to communicate and share information faster as well as liaise over great distances. This is assisting with the complexity of projects but has also highlighted the critical contribution of people in delivering projects.

Women-sig-logo 2So what do you think the prognosis is for women in project management over the next 5 years?

It is mixed. Our 2014 survey showed more women – 70% actually – had been in the industry for less than ten years, and if this trend continues then the overall numbers will continue to increase. However the survey also highlighted concerns over career progression and maintaining a work life balance. More women were interested in exploring freelance and consultant options than in our previous survey. There was also a desire for best practice to be shared including work place practices.

While I am optimistic about greater numbers of women in project management, I am concerned that if this talent pool is not adequately nurtured and managed, it could impact adversely on job satisfaction and retention. Companies with progressive workplace practices will continue to attract and retain women PMs.

What advice would you give a woman wanting a career in project management?

It’s challenging and can be quite fulfilling. It is well suited to women and utilizes skills that they have developed in everyday life. The huge range of sectors is also a plus. Planning for career progression is however as important as successfully delivering on projects and programmes. Let others be aware of your successes, be willing to take risks and learn from situations that do not turn out as planned. A sponsor is not optional as their support is key over time regardless of your own network. Finally, choose your employer carefully to maintain a good work life balance.

Women in project management also should be mindful that what gets them into a particular role will not necessarily move them on to the next stage. They have to be reflective and aware of the often unwritten rules of the workplace.

Finally, I’ve heard about the Inspire project. What’s it all about and how can we get involved?

The Inspiring the Future: Inspiring Women project is an external initiative which encourages young girls to aspire to careers they would not ordinarily have considered. They are looking to get 15,000 volunteers and are more than halfway there. WiPM is championing this initiative during our anniversary year, encouraging project managers both male and female to sign up. The time commitment is just one hour a year to visit a school close to your home or workplace and promote project management as a career choice.

APM overall is also supporting Inspiring the Future campaign and monitoring the number of project managers signing up. WiPM are commissioning a video for use in schools by both project managers and career advisors.

Thanks, Teri!

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About Elizabeth Harrin

Elizabeth HarrinElizabeth Harrin FAPM is a professional project manager and award-winning blogger behind A Girl's Guide To Project Management. She's passionate about demystifying project management and making tools and techniques work in the real world. She's also the author of several books including the PMI bestseller, Collaboration Tools for Project Managers.
Elizabeth lives in the UK with her family. She uses her organisation and project management skills at home, and also to help other bloggers at Totally Organised Blogging.

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